Tips for travelling light

In the world of travel, light is better. The advantages of being able to travel light include saving time, energy and money, all of which translate into a more enjoyable trip.

Why would you want to travel light?
Of course, the easiest way is to travel with a smaller suitcase!  Travelling with carry-on luggage that can fit into the overhead bin in the plane means no lost luggage and no waiting at the luggage carousel. Not having to pay for checked luggage on a plane, or tipping porters, also saves money. Smaller, lighter luggage is easier when navigating stairs, trains, buses or taxis, and when getting through crowds of people.

For carry-on or checked luggage, the first consideration is picking lightweight luggage. Choosing light luggage can save more than two kilos in weight for a carry-on, without sacrificing wheels or durability.  Soft-cover luggage can be more convenient, but you can buy hard cover suitcases that are also lightweight. Search Google for “lightest suitcases” to get some ideas.

Packing Light
Packing for warm climates is easier and requires less clothing. Clothing should be made of lightweight material, mix and match and be able to be worn in layers. One rule of thumb is that all tops should match each other and match all bottoms, drastically reducing the number of articles of clothing that are necessary.

If this sounds boring, add in a fun accessory. For women, scarves are not only light and versatile, but are also safer than wearing jewellery.  Leaving the jewellery at home saves space and weight too!

Clothing that can be worn for more than one occasion or purpose also lightens the load. Pack one good, simple piece that can be dressed up or down with a scarf, belt, or tie.

Since shoes can be a heavy article of clothing, having shoes that are multi-purpose reduces the number of pairs required. Also, pack the lightest shoes and wear the heavy ones during travel.

Packing the Shoulder Bag
Reducing the small items in your shoulder bag may not seem like much, but definitely contributes to the ease of travelling light. Books can be reduced by using an electronic reader such as a Kindle, an iPad, or even just by using the free Kindle reader app on your phone. You can also exchange books with your fellow travellers, rather than carrying multiple books yourself.

Medications can be counted out for the number of days of the trip plus a few extra, always remembering to have a copy of the prescription in case you need more medication in an emergency.  Keep medications in your shoulder bag, close to hand.

If you want to travel with a water bottle, a flexible, refillable one is lighter and more convenient than a hard bottle. Remember the bottle must be empty when you pass through security, but you can fill it from a water fountain after security.

Cameras and smartphones
Bulky cameras and attachments can now be left at home because smartphones can take good quality photos, particularly with special clip-on lenses. The new Google Pixel phone, and the Samsung Galaxy S7, have particularly good cameras.

Final Check
As a final check, either lay everything out together or pack it a day or two in advance. The day before the trip begins, remove two items!  Looking at the remaining items, ask yourself if you really need if and if you are sure you will use it or wear it.

You can use a luggage scale to confirm the weight – digital and analogue scales are available – or you can stand on a bathroom scale with and without your luggage to measure the weight difference.

Preparing your phone for your holiday

Before you go on your next trip, taking some time to prepare your smartphone will help you to get the most out of it while you are on holiday. Here’s what you need to do:

Synchronise and delete unwanted data
Synchronise your phone with your computer before your trip. This will back up all your photos and other data, in case your phone is lost or stolen. (Your travel insurance or gadget insurance can never replace the magic moments stored on your phone.)

Once you’ve backed up, you can delete some things from your phone, to make sure there is lots of memory left for the photos and videos you will take on your holiday. As well as deleting unwanted apps that you no longer use, consider deleting photos and especially videos, because these take a lot of memory. You can also trim videos, just keeping the best bits, to reduce their size.

Roaming
Check that you have roaming turned on for your phone. This will allow you to use calls, text, and data while you are on holiday. You will often need to phone your network operator to arrange for roaming to be turned on. If you have recently changed your phone or your network, roaming will probably be turned off.

Be aware that charges apply for roaming, and it can be expensive. Fortunately, new EU legislation means that your network operator is now more limited in how much they can charge you, and from 15th June 2017 roaming charges in the EU will be abolished. (More information here.) You are best to use wifi abroad whenever you can, rather than your phone’s data connection, to be on the safe side.

It is most useful to turn data roaming off, but leave call and text roaming on. This means that your phone will not be able to keep using data to connect in the background, to retrieve emails etc, unless you are connected to wifi.

Apple roaming information is useful, and Google will give you Android roaming information too.

Know how to work your phone
Two very useful features are Flight Mode and the torch. (The torch illuminates the LED flash on your phone.) Make sure you know how to find these quickly. Search Google if you’re not sure.

Load up with travel apps
In previous newsletters we have covered some of the most useful apps. As a reminder:

  • Download TripAdvisor, open it, then download the offline city guide for the place you are visiting, if one is available. It’s free of charge. Then you can still read TripAdvisor when you don’t have an internet connection.
  • Download some kind of communication app to stay in touch with folks back home. Skype, WhatsApp, or Facebook Messenger would be useful. Make sure you add your family and friends to the app before you go, so that you can actually contact them!
  • Download a currency converter app such as XE. Load it up before you go away to get the latest exchange rates into the app before you travel.
  • Put a couple of games on your phone to pass the time. Go to your phone’s app store and you will quickly see the latest trending games. Many are free. Make sure the games don’t need the internet in order to work (test it before you go by turning on Flight Mode then playing the game).
  • Use the Sky TV app to record any TV programmes that you might miss while you’re away. (You can often use iPlayer to catch up when you get home, anyway.)

Social media
Just a word of caution: don’t write about your holiday publicly on social media until you get home. Otherwise you are advertising to the world that your house is unoccupied, and you might be in for a nasty surprise when you get home!

Reading material
Put the Kindle app onto your phone. It’s free, and you can get some free and very low cost books, including travel guides to the place you are visiting. This lets you save weight when packing, by leaving your books at home.

If you use Dropbox for storing your files, the Dropbox app has an offline mode, where you can download files for reading without an internet connection. This can be useful if you have newsletters or other files in PDF format that you wish to read.

Pack your charger, adapter and battery pack
Don’t forget to take your phone charger and its cable. You will also need a plug adapter for EU power sockets (check it fits the exact country you’re visiting).

You should also consider a spare external battery pack. These are quite cheap, and are readily available for iPhone and Android phones. The higher the capacity (measured in mAh), the more charge the battery pack will give you. Don’t forget to charge up the battery pack before you go away, because most do not come pre-charged.

A cultural winter getaway in Copenhagen

If you’re seeking a true white winter holiday, Denmark is your place and its capital, Copenhagen, offers the perfect mix of unique culture and snow-covered wilderness. As with most places in Europe during this time of year, things can get a bit chilly, but Scandinavia’s weather has its own special delights.

Exploring alternative Copenhagen and the side you haven’t seen
Denmark’s capital is well known for its old town, harbour and palaces, which should not be missed by first timers, but sometimes the city’s best attractions are hidden. One of the more popular alternative destinations is Freetown Christiania, well known for its sovereign governmental stance and 1960s lifestyle in the heart of Copenhagen. The odd little community is host to art-filled cafes, workshops, restaurants full of organic goods, and your fair share of amazing people-watching.

If you’re looking for a quick break from the city centre, the charming haven of Nokken is ideal for a relaxing day trip. Reminiscent of The Shire, you’ll find hobbit-style, tiny homes, bountiful gardens and spectacular sunset views of the harbour. Stop in one of the cozy cafes around town if you get chilly for a warming glass of “gløgg”, a local’s favourite Danish style hot spiced wine.

A dining experience beyond the tourist food trucks
When locals grab a bite to eat downtown, most turn to the new street food market on Paper Island (Papirøen). You’ll find quality dishes from around the world, most at an affordable price and some filling meals for as low as £5.

For a higher end Scandinavian meal, Noma is a favourite. The location couldn’t be better, sitting dead centre in the city, with gorgeous views of the river. It’s far enough away from the bustle that you’ll have a relaxing or romantic dining experience yet be near the action after dinner.

If you’re new to Denmark, don’t miss the traditional open-face sandwiches (smørrebrød) served in a variety of styles. A trip to Copenhagen isn’t complete until you’ve tasted Danish meatballs (frikadeller), which are being served up nearly everywhere you look.

Escape the city and see the country
This time of year, the snow is sure to be falling throughout Northern Europe, and there’s no better way to celebrate than breaking out the skis or snowboard. Since Denmark is a generally flat country, it doesn’t boast the extreme skiing that France and Italy may offer. Yet for those looking to get outside and take it easy on the hill, Hedelands Skicentre is perfect. The hill is only a 35-minute drive from downtown Copenhagen, making it a great option for a winter day trip. Most of the mountain is extremely user-friendly and has runs for any level of skier. Adult day tickets are only £11, and tickets for children are £6.

“Dyrehaven,” Danish for Deer Park, is another great option to see the countryside. It’s usually pretty quiet during the winter, which makes for peaceful strolls and exquisite wildlife viewing. The park is just north of the city – don’t forget to wrap up warm!

City essentials not to be missed
Nyhavn is one of Copenhagen’s most visited destinations, and while it may be busy, your first view of the port will show you why. The area is full of little restaurants surrounding the canal, and with a quick look around you’ll find that many have great live music. If it’s not too cold, do as the locals do and grab a beer from one of the shops and have a seat on the dock to enjoy the sunset.

For any beer fan, a tour of the Carlsberg brewery is a fascinating excursion. You’ll watch their unique brewing process that seems to provide beer to half of Europe. From the outside, you’d think Carlsberg is a castle for the old Danish king!

The ice rink at Frederiksberg Runddel is ideal for families or couples looking to join this age-old Danish tradition. Every year the area is transformed into a winter paradise offering a classic holiday experience. You can rent a pair of skates for £6.

Copenhagen is an amazing place to be during the winter months. You’ll dodge the tourist rush of summer and receive a true Danish experience, so don’t let the cold discourage you!

Using mobile apps to find holiday entertainment

The happy holiday memories that you look back on with fondness often come from the events and entertainment that you have experienced.

Whether it’s local musicians playing guitars in a restaurant in Kefalonia, eating and drinking in the beer halls of Munich during Oktoberfest, or listening to a Mozart concert in Vienna, these are memories to last a lifetime.

But how do you find the perfect event suited to you?

Find events and discounts with the Time Out app
One way is to use the Time Out app, which is free for iPhone or Android.  Time Out, as you may know if you live in London, is a respected entertainment listings magazine, first published in 1968: it has a long and distinguished pedigree of highlighting fun things to do.

The app covers the European cities of Amsterdam, Barcelona, Berlin, Madrid, and Paris. The country of Croatia is also covered, as are the UK cities of London, Birmingham, Bristol, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds, and Manchester. This makes the app worth downloading for use at home as well as abroad.

Categories that you can explore include Things to do this week, Free events this week, Art this week, and Upcoming gigs. You can also book a theatre show, and find restaurants, bars, and pubs nearby.

Each event has a short write-up by Time Out staff, explaining what’s going on and what you can expect. The app gives dates and times for the event. There are also links to event websites, to give you more information. Usefully, there are user reviews, comments, and star ratings, so you can learn what to expect from others who have been to the event.

The app has “Exclusive Offers” too, which sometimes get updated every day. This is well worth a look.

The content changes often, so you can look at the app before you go, to get an idea of things you might like to do, and then check again while you’re on holiday to see if any last minute activities or offers have been added.

Overall, this is a very polished and useful app. If you are visiting any of the places its covers, it’s well worth downloading it, especially since it is free!

TripAdvisor app
While many people associate TripAdvisor more with hotel and restaurant reviews, it also has a good selection of what it calls “Things to Do”.

It has vast coverage, so most places in Europe will have listings. TripAdvisor mostly covers ongoing activities, such as museums, sights, theatres, bike tours, and spas, rather than short-term events such as festivals and carnivals.

Christmas treats: Lapland, Stockholm, and Paris

There is perhaps one season that Europe does better than anywhere else, and that is winter. Across the continent, it is a time to swap presents, share food, and engage in end-of-year revelry with friends and family, as we all seek to ward off the cold and the dark of those long, wintry nights.

Seasonal events are a booming industry: Christmas markets are the perennial favourite, and nowadays you can find stalls and chalets lining the streets of almost every town – from Sheffield to the south bank of the Thames, as well as more traditionally the streets of Germany and Austria.

Yet no matter how much you enjoy shopping for gifts and sipping mulled wine in a rustic marketplace, winter in Europe has much more to offer than this alone. Here are some of the locations that will help to bring an extra touch of magic to your end of year holiday.

Enchanting Lapland
A magical family adventure for young and old alike can be found in the remotest part of Finland’s north. According to folklore, Lapland is the traditional home of Father Christmas himself, and the locals have missed no opportunity in bringing this fairytale to life for seasonal visitors!

Direct flights operate throughout December from multiple locations across the UK, and many of our smaller regional airports are the starting point for package deals.

On arrival, there is no end of sleigh rides, mulled wine, and seasonal dinners. While younger visitors may be enchanted by the chance to visit Santa’s workshop, it is usually the prospect of glimpsing the Aurora Borealis (also known as the Northern Lights) which appeals to older travellers.

It is even possible to visit Lapland as part of a same-day return trip, offered by Thomas Cook and others. Do a Google search for “Lapland day trips” if you are interested. Just remember to pack for the cold climate!

The Festival of Light, Stockholm
All across Sweden, the 13th December is the annual festival of light: marking the day of Saint Lucy. For many Swedes, the event marks the true start of Christmas, and families come together to share a festive julbord (the traditional Christmas buffet), drink mulled wine (“glögg”), or indulge in saffron buns baked to mark the occasion – the Lussekatt.

The event is not a public holiday in Sweden, which means shops and services remain open throughout the day. Once night falls though, the city streets are brought to life with music and light, as children sing hymns, put on traditional costumes, and stage a candlelit procession through the streets. It is a moment to see Scandinavia at its most festive and picturesque.

New Year’s Eve on the Seine, Paris
If you are searching for a spectacular destination to bring in the new year, you do not have to look any further than Paris.

Although many of the world’s capital cities will host New Year’s Eve extravaganzas, few can muster the sheer wealth of opportunities that Paris offers: from the Champs Elysées and Arc de Triomphe to the Eiffel Tower and Notre-Dame Cathedral, there are countless iconic landmarks to select as the backdrop to your evening of music, light shows, and fireworks.

However, the epitome of Parisian luxury can be found on board one of the fine dining river cruises that sail along the Seine on New Year’s Eve. From the comfort of your dining table, you can take in all of the sights of the city at once, while also enjoying a gourmet dinner service.

For those who enjoy the finer things in life, it is perhaps the ideal way to start 2017.

Advantages to seeing Europe in winter

A winter holiday? It may not be the most traditional choice to go away when the nights draw in. However, there can be quite a few unexpected advantages for those who choose to go abroad from late November to early February.

Here’s how you can get the most out of a winter break.

Warmer climates
According to the Met Office, the United Kingdom has an average temperature of around 4C (40F) during winter. If you’re looking to escape the biting air and freezing rain, a holiday in the south of Europe could prove ideal.

The temperature in certain cities such as Seville and Athens will rarely go below 20C (68F) and 10C (50F) respectively during winter, due to the climate of countries such as Spain and Greece.

The warmer weather also means that key outdoor sites in the Mediterranean, such as the Parthenon and Real Alcazar, don’t close to the public.

Shorter queues, thinner crowds, and better availability
For almost all European countries, the winter months are seen as an off-peak time for tourism. Certain attractions, such as the city of Venice, have a (not undeserved) reputation for becoming ghost towns. This is often due to a drop in temperature and a rise in rain, but it can also be down to fashion – people don’t go, because people don’t go!

But this need not be a disadvantage. If you are planning to travel mainly to see the sights, take photographs, or visit heritage sites, the comparative lack of people in winter could prove to be a significant boon. As well as simply helping with getting around, the lack of summer crowds means that you may have a better chance to explore unhindered.

This doesn’t just apply to visiting open streets and plazas. You may have a more enjoyable time visiting larger museums, such as the Louvre in Paris. Heavy summer crowds are somewhat notorious for blocking views of the art, defeating the point of going there!

Queues to get into certain buildings and landmarks will also (typically) be much shorter. Additionally, metropolitan hotel rooms are often easier to find and book.

However, beware disappointment when trying to late book accommodation in popular seasonal locales such as Rovaniemi, Finland, which bills itself as being the “official” home of Santa Claus! Winter availability can go down as well as up.

It’s more affordable in winter
Winter travelling at off-peak times can often be a good way to get the absolute most out of your holiday budget. Rail fares, air fares, and nightly hotel rates can all prove substantially lower, as there are fewer travellers. Special winter discounts or deals are sometimes available for tourists.

Potentially, these lower prices could allow you to extend your break further or visit more places than you would in the summer. It could also allow you to get more value out of the present pound to euro exchange rates.

The time immediately around Christmas is generally an exception: travel costs tend to go up dramatically.

Winter-only attractions
Some countries also have natural and cultural attractions that can only be seen while travelling during midwinter, and we look at those in more detail further on in this newsletter.

In the darkest months, the northern lights can often be seen in Scotland, Norway, and Finland. For the adventurous, winter is also a great time to watch snowsport in the Alps and elsewhere. And of course, the Christmas markets in Austrian and German cities such as Cologne, Vienna, and Munich are world renowned.

Uber: a taxi service on your smartphone

If you’re looking for a cheap alternative to a hire car on your holidays, especially for city breaks, then Uber could be just what you need. It’s effectively a taxi service that you order directly from an app on your phone.

You’ve probably heard about Uber, because it’s become incredibly popular, and is often in the news. There’s no more trying to find a taxi rank, looking up the phone number of a minicab firm, or waiting outside in long queues.

Uber serves many cities within Europe, including the UK, so you can use Uber at home and abroad. Here is the full list of European cities supported by Uber.

Download Uber for iPhone
Download Uber for Android from the Google Play store

How Uber works
You download the Uber app onto your smartphone, which knows your location. Then you ask the app for a car to pick you up, and tell the app where you want to go.

The price of the journey is calculated within the app, so you know how much you’re going to pay before you get in the car. At peak times prices get more expensive, but off-peak you can get a real bargain.

Payment is also handled within the app (linked to your credit card), so you don’t have to mess around trying to pay the driver in an unfamiliar foreign currency.

The app shows you a map so you can see how far away your car is from you, and when it is likely to arrive.

Uber is very popular, and in our experience in several cities, it works well.

Staying safe
While millions of trips have been successfully completed on Uber, you should take the same sensible precautions as you would when getting into any cab.

Take a look at the Uber trip safety page for more info.

Uber promotional code for a free ride
There are almost always lots of promotional codes for free Uber rides or discounts, because Uber as a company is trying to expand rapidly. The codes change quite often, so just do a Google search for Uber promo codes when you download the app.

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Tips for visiting Christmas markets

Christmas markets are held in many towns and cities between the end of November and a day or two before Christmas. Medieval squares are decorated with Christmas trees and lights, making an enchanting backdrop to the bustling stalls where you can shop for charming gifts and decorations.

Here’s how to get the most out of your pre-Christmas city break:

Book your flight early
Cheap flights to the largest Christmas markets such as Munich, Cologne and Nuremberg sell out quickly, so book early to get the best deals, or check out flights to less well-known markets such as those held in Stuttgart and Hamburg. Price comparison sites such as Kayak and Skyscanner can show you the most competitive prices.

It is often better to book directly with the airline though. For example, easyJet does not allow anyone to sell their flights more cheaply than they do, so just book directly on easyJet.com. The longer you wait before buying your tickets, the more expensive they will be.

Think carefully about whether you need to take a suitcase with you. You will probably only be going away for a few days, so it’s tempting just to take hand luggage, but if you want to bring back lots of souvenirs and presents from the market, make sure you’ve got enough space to carry them home! Because of the need to take lots of warm clothes, it’s probably best to take a suitcase.

You may prefer to travel in an escorted group with a specialist operator: prices are from £299 for a four-day tour by Eurostar of some of the best markets. Google “Christmas market tour” to start researching your options.

Wrap up with layers
Germany can be very cold in winter: the festive markets are all held outdoors, and you will be standing outside for a few hours, so wearing several layers of clothing will help ward off chills. If you’re prone to getting cold feet, take some good thick socks!

Wear sensible shoes
The streets and squares of German towns are often paved with cobblestones that can sometimes be a little slippery. Flat shoes with non-slip soles are the best way to avoid trips and falls.

Sample local delicacies
Give your taste buds a treat when you try the local Christmas delicacies such as mulled cider and stollen, wild boar sausages and decorated cookies. You will be asked to pay a deposit, usually around 2 euros, for a mug of glühwein; you can sometimes then keep the pottery cup as a souvenir (although it’s best to ask!).

Photography
The colour and bustling crowds of Christmas markets offer wonderful opportunities for photographers: the scene really comes to life as darkness falls. Mobile phone cameras often don’t take great pictures when it’s dark, so if you have a digital camera, take it with you when you go out.

Take care of yourself
If you require medication, be sure to pack enough for your visit and keep it with you in your hand luggage. Even on a short break, health insurance is advisable or you could find yourself facing big bills should you be unfortunate enough fall ill.

If you plan on doing some serious eating and drinking – and why not? – then you might want to carry some indigestion tablets with you when you go out to the market!

Other Christmas markets
While we tend to think of Christmas markets as typically German, Krakow in Poland has held markets at Christmastime for centuries. Bruges Christmas market is equally authentic and the city is easily reached by Eurostar. Vienna, a beautiful and atmospheric city, also has a Christmas market.

Riga: a winter wonderland

The fairy-tale medieval city of Riga, in Latvia, makes an intriguing destination for a winter city break, despite the long hours of darkness and the freezing temperatures. There are plenty of interesting things to see and do, and it is much less crowded than during the summer months. Riga is the perfect destination to rediscover the joys of winter.

Things to See and Do in Riga
The tradition of decorating a Christmas tree is believed to originate in Riga, and the Old Town has a ridiculously Christmassy feel from November onwards.

Although Riga only has one Christmas market – held in the main square – it’s a very good one, and is an excellent place to sip mulled wine and buy local handicrafts, such as traditional woollen mittens.

Riga lends itself to exploring on foot. There are a number of free walking tours taking you on historic routes through the Jewish Quarter, the quaint Old Town with its maze-like qualities, and the Art Noveau district – did you know that Riga has the highest concentration of Art Nouveau buildings in the world?

Riga is filled with museums, such as the beautiful Latvian National Museum of Art, the Museum of the History of Riga and Navigation, and the Latvian War Museum. The splendid Dome Cathedral is also well worth a visit.

Snow is expected in Latvia every winter, so why not explore the untouched pine forests with a breathtakingly magical horse-drawn sleigh ride? Winter rides can be booked at the Tiraines Stalli farm, on the outskirts of Riga.

Discover Latvia’s Cuisine 
Sample Latvian cuisine at one of Riga’s many restaurants, such as Vincents, which offers delicious gourmet food, and Milda, a popular and friendly restaurant with a traditional menu. Look out for the potato dumplings and the Baltic antipasti.

Weather: What to Expect
In the winter months, Riga’s climate tends to hover around freezing, with highs of 4C (39F), although the wind can easily make it feel a lot colder than that! Cool crisp snowy days are common, although cannot be guaranteed. Wrap up warm!

Where to Stay
The Neiburgs Hotel won the 2016 Travellers’ Choice Awards and is a large modern hotel in the city centre with double rooms from £105 per night. There are numerous hotels offering plenty of off-season bargains, such as the Wellton Centrum and Spa Hotel, with rooms from as little as £56 per night.

Travel apps: weather and travel guides

Modern technology can give us a wealth of up-to-date information about our holiday destination. As Samuel Johnson said, when two English people meet, their first talk is of the weather, so let’s start there. 

WeatherPro covers weather for Europe

Having tried out a few weather apps, the best seems to be WeatherPro. It covers weather for the whole of Europe (and beyond), and gives forecasts for individual towns and cities, or sometimes even different places within the city. Of course, this means it will work at home as well as when you’re on holiday.

You get clear forecasts, broken down hour-by-hour, showing amounts of sun and rain forecast during the hour, which is very useful to plan when you want to do your outdoor activities like going to the beach, and when you want to be inside to avoid the rain.

You also get satellite and radar images, so you can see cloud and rain as they move across the skies, and see whether you think you’re going to avoid the showers!

Forecasts with WeatherPro are usually quite accurate for today and tomorrow, but science hasn’t yet really mastered making predictions beyond this, so no app will be particularly accurate once you get to three days out or more.

WeatherPro costs a few pounds for a yearly subscription, but in our experience it’s an app you will use every day, whether at home or on holiday.

See WeatherPro for iPhone or WeatherPro for Android

Travel guides on Kindle, written by locals

Traditional guidebooks still have their place, and at least the battery can’t run out with a book! But Amazon Kindle (and other similar eReaders) has opened up the world of travel writing to a much wider range of people. 

This means that locals who live in a town or city have started to write their own guidebooks, and sell them through Amazon quite cheaply. Often, you will see the publisher listed as “CreateSpace”, which is an Amazon-owned tool allowing people to publish their own books. This ability to sell their work means that the best writing is often on Amazon through these guides, rather than on free websites. 

The Kindle editions are often quite cheap, and you can keep them on the free Kindle app on your phone, to save them from bulking out your bag.

The self-published guides are often quite different to the Rough Guide, Lonely Planet, and Dorling Kindersley books. They tend to be shorter, and they often focus on some of the less touristy activities that you wouldn’t otherwise find out about. It’s also an interesting window into the culture of the locals, to see how they view the place they call home. 

Amazon tends to hide these guides that are written by locals, preferring to push the books by the big travel publishers, so you have to search around a bit. A search such as “Vienna by local” or “Paris by local” can get some good results though.

A few example guides written by locals: ViennaParisMilan.

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