Make your smartphone a travel force to be reckoned with!

Whether you’re a late adopter of 21st-century tech or a keen lover of the latest apps, your smartphone is one tool you don’t want to leave at home on vacation. Harness its power with the sleekest and most practical travel apps to make your next trip run smoothly.

We’ve covered a lot of apps over the last few months, so we thought it would be useful to give you a quick roundup of everything you should be considering on your phone for your next trip, including some new goodies we haven’t mentioned before. There’s bound to be something here that you’ll find useful.

You can easily find any of these apps for iPhone or Android – just search for them on your app store.

Booking your holiday
Staying connected while travelling can be a lifesaver – literally – but your smartphone can be an important resource even before you’ve left home. Use a flight aggregator like Kayak or Skyscanner to search for plane tickets.

Search for a room on Hotels.com or get a cosier, more residential space with Airbnb.

If you’re comfortable winging it, wait until arrival and get deep discounts on your accommodations with Hotel Tonight.

TripIt will forward all your confirmation emails to a single custom itinerary, to help you stay organised.

When you travel
Skip the jet lag with JetLag Genie, which helps you adjust your sleep schedule before departure.

Generate a packing list with PackPoint to ensure you don’t leave anything behind, and prepare to hit the road!

In the airport, GateGuru can show you a map of the terminal, reviews of onsite restaurants, and even estimated wait times for the security line.

Find a prime spot to wait for your flight using Lounge Buddy.

Stock up on reading material for the flight by saving articles to Pocket for offline use.

When you’re on holiday
Once you’re back on solid ground, you may be used to using Google Maps to get around town. If you don’t have internet access in your new destination, try MapsMe instead, or Tripadvisor offline maps (you can download a whole city guide on TripAdvisor).

HopStop and AllSubway can help you navigate even the most mind-boggling public transport system.

If you’re renting a car, download GasBuddy to help you find the nearest fill-up station.

Are you hopping from city to city by bus or train? Rome2Rio (called FetchMyWay on Android), compiles a seemingly endless number of overland routes to any destination you can imagine.

Uber operates in many cities, and can be a quick and easy way to get a taxi. In some cities Uber is cheap, but in some cities like Dublin it’s very expensive, so keep an eye on costs.

Expensify can help you document expenses, but for keeping better track of your travel budget, install a more comprehensive finance app like Mint.

You’ll never be strapped for cash with the PinPin ATM Finder, and you can be sure you’re leaving the right tip with Tipulator.

Finding things to do
When the dinner bell rings, you may be tempted to rely on TripAdvisor and Yelp for restaurant reviews. These are good resources, but you can get specific dish recommendations on Tastespotting.

For a unique take on sightseeing, you can find locals’ favourite hotspots on Localeur and upcoming events on Goby.

Invite a local friend to join you on the WithLocals app.

Need help with a language barrier? Rely on Google Translate or hire an interpreter via Whym.

Safety
No matter where your travels take you, put safety first. TravelSafe hosts a database of emergency phone numbers around the world. You can even pin your destination’s police and ambulance contacts to your phone’s home screen.

So no matter which of our travel hotspots this month takes your fancy, keeping your journey in the 21st century is a snap with the right app!

Tips for healthy eating while travelling

One of the delights of travelling is the chance to experience new cuisines and sample authentic ethnic foods. Enjoying a delicious meal in a foreign city is as good as visiting the national museums – you learn about the traditions, culture and people from the food they share with you.

In the excitement of discovering a new country, however, there is always the temptation to go overboard. Who can say no to “just one more” bite? You’re on holiday after all!

But sometimes a sudden introduction of a new food can upset your digestion or disrupt your healthy eating habits. Here are a few tips to help you eat healthy on the road.

Be prepared
If you have dietary restrictions because of allergies or health conditions, or take medication regularly, make sure you know in advance what foods are common at your destination. A lot of restaurants publish their menus online, so you can get an idea of the sort of food, and the types of restaurant, that you should expect.

Spend a little time planning how to substitute your usual treats. When you arrive, try and stick to your normal eating schedule as much as possible. Keep a small snack in your handbag or daypack, just in case there are delays.

You can sometimes bring in snacks from the UK, but this varies from country to country. Be sure to check before you go, so that you don’t fall foul of customs!

Before you go, finding restaurants on TripAdvisor, or other online sources, can be useful. That way, you won’t just stop at the first fast-food place you find when you’re hungry and gorge on unhealthy food, while missing the local treats on offer.

Vitamins and medications
If you take vitamin tablets or other health supplements, you may wish to take these on holiday with you. That way, if you can’t find healthy options, or fancy spoiling yourself, at least your body can get some of the nutrients it needs.

If you take medications, check before you go whether there are any specific foods that you should avoid, and whether you can combine your medications with alcohol. Check with your pharmacist if you are unsure, and read the information that comes with your medication, even if you’ve been taking the medication for a while: it’s useful to remind yourself of things you might have forgotten.

Some foods and drink can prevent medicines from fully working. For example, the painkillers paracetamol and codeine are metabolised by the liver, so drinking alcohol as well can put a lot of stress on the liver. Thinking of a classic breakfast buffet, grapefruit can interfere with statins, and milk can interfere with some antibiotics.

Master the art of nibbling
Do taste the local speciality, but don’t binge on it. Give your body time to adjust to unaccustomed seasonings and sauces. Share a plate of starters with your partner or table mates, so you can sample without overeating. Eat slowly to savour every bite. If you discover something you really enjoy, learn how to pronounce it correctly so you can order it again!

Ask questions
In a new restaurant, tell your waiter or waitress about any dietary restrictions you have, so they can advise you about certain dishes. Ask for the house recommendations. If the menu doesn’t explain a dish adequately, ask how it’s prepared. Do express your appreciation to the staff for their consideration.

Be aware that not all countries are as used to dealing with food allergies as the UK. There can also be language barriers and a lack of training: some staff do not fully appreciate what “dairy” means, and all the items that it includes, so you might need to spell out all the things you can’t eat (e.g. butter, milk, yoghurt, etc.). If in doubt, play it safe!

Drink water and avoid dehydration
Drink plenty of water every day. Keep a bottle of water in your jacket or bag. Staying hydrated keeps your energy level high, reduces overeating, and helps your body flush out toxins and waste.

Bottled water can be purer than tap water. In some places this isn’t a problem, but in other areas, drinking the local tap water (including ice in drinks) can make you ill if you are not used to it. Check online, and in your travel guide.

Sometimes, feeling hungry can really just mean you are dehydrated, and it’s water that your body needs, not food. This can lead you to over-eat and not get enough fluids: a double whammy!

Alcohol
Enjoy the wine and spirits with a little common sense. Locally brewed beer can be a pleasure, and a wine or whisky tasting can be a highlight of your trip. But too much alcohol can lead to dehydration or can lead you to make poor food choices. When it comes to alcohol, aim for quality, not quantity!

Be aware that alcohol can make you more intoxicated and dehydrated when you are flying, due to the effects of altitude and cabin pressure, so be especially careful around the start and end of your holiday.

Shop locally
When you come across a neighbourhood market, stop and shop. Locally-grown fruits and vegetables will often be fresher and more economical that supermarket purchases. It’s also an adventure in and of itself to navigate a foreign grocery, with all its sights, sounds and aromas. Pick up fresh or dried fruits, cheese, bread and pastries, find a scenic spot, and enjoy a picnic lunch.

Come home healthy!
Like music, food is a universal language. You may come home with new recipes to try in your own kitchen, or a new appreciation for a food you once disliked. Above all, though, come home healthy.

Sensational Split: Life on the Adriatic

Split, the pearl on Croatia’s Dalmatian Coast, offers the rare combination of a beach and city break. This is a city rich in heritage and culture, but also gives locals and visitors the opportunity to head over to the beach when they need to do a spot of relaxing. It’s a great city to visit, and temperatures will soon be pleasant at this time of year, with average highs of 17C (63F) and 23C (73F) in April and May respectively.

Roaming around a Roman palace
The UNESCO heritage site and world-famous Diocletian’s Palace is the heart of the city. Built around 300AD, this Roman palace is one of the best-preserved sites of its era. The palace feels like a separate city, packed full of shops, restaurants and bars. You can easily lose yourself in its maze of streets and alleys for a whole day.

There’s always something going on here, whether it’s music, theatre or dance. Don’t miss the centuries-old ceremony of the changing of the guards, every day at 12 pm. At the start of May, the city’s annual “Festival of Flowers” showcases hundreds of displays around the palace, including within the palace’s cellars.

Italian food
Due to a close historical relationship with Italy, a short trip of less than 150 miles across the Adriatic, menus along the coastline are heavily inspired by Italian food: risottos, fish and seafood are all popular dishes in many restaurants. You’re sure to enjoy the world-class local wine in bars and restaurants throughout the city, and there are plenty of vineyards surrounding the city where you can learn from the growers and, most importantly, try more of their produce.

Life at the beach
Split’s position on the Adriatic means that beach trips are an essential part of life for locals, and you’ll find whole families flocking to them on weekends and summer evenings. The most popular and famous beach in the city is Bacvice beach, which is one of the few sandy beaches on the coast. This may not be the best beach in the area, but if you want to live like a local then find a spot on the sand and join everyone relaxing, eating and playing picigin, a hugely popular Croatian beach game.

If you want a more peaceful and relaxing beach visit then you’re better off walking west, following the coastline round to Jezinac. The beaches here are a good alternative, with bars offering great sunset views.

Boats
You can’t fail to notice the impressive collection of boats and yachts moored in the city; if you’d like to see more or dream about which one you’ll buy, the “Croatia Boat Show” gives you that chance. The show runs 5th – 9th April.

Head for the hills!
Anyone looking to escape the crowds of the city, or wanting to get back to nature, shouldn’t leave without visiting the tree-filled hills of Marjan. This shady park looms over the city and is an ideal escape for locals and tourists alike. There’s good reason why locals refer to Marjan as the “lungs” of the city: it’s a great place for walking, cycling and relaxing in general. There are also plenty of secluded beaches dotted around that you will often have all to yourself.