Australia Travel Tips

Note that EHICPlus does NOT offer insurance cover for trips to Australia, but our sister policy ANZPlus can give you a great travel insurance quote for Australia.

Ride in style

  • On your departure day call the airport or check on the internet to make sure your flight is on time.
  • Try to drink plenty of water, whether you’re driving or flying, so you don’t become dehydrated from the air-conditioning.
  • Reduce the pain of popping ears on the plane by sucking a lolly, chewing gum or gently blowing your nose.
  • Make regular stops when driving, and walk around on the plane to kick-start your circulation.
  • When travelling wear comfortable, loose shoes that you can slip on and off easily and that will allow for your feet to swell.

Customs: What You Can Bring Into Australia
The duty-free allowance in Australia is A$900 (US$720) or, for those under 18, A$450 (US$360). Anyone over 18 can bring in up to 250 cigarettes or 250 grams of cigars or other tobacco products, 2.25 litres (41 fluid oz.) of alcohol, and “dutiable goods” to the value of A$900 (US$720), or A$450 (US$360) if you are under 18.
You need not declare cash in any currency, and other currency instruments, such as traveller’s checks, under a value of A$10,000.

Because Australia is an island, it is free of many agricultural and livestock diseases. To keep it that way, strict quarantine applies to importing plants, animals, and their products, including food. “Sniffer” dogs at Australian airports detect these products (as well as drugs). Some items may be held for treatment and returned to you; others may be confiscated; and others may be held over for you to take with you when you leave the country. Amnesty trash bins are available before you reach the immigration counters in airport arrivals halls for items such as fruit.

Know the Aussie climate

  • Regularly apply repellents and only sleep with the window open if you have flyscreens to avoid insect bites.
  • Apply sunscreen regularly. If you are snorkelling or swimming, make sure your back and all other exposed areas are well covered. Four days lying on your tummy in agony does not spell fun!
  • Only swim in the safe area at the beach, between the red and yellow flags.
  • If walking for long periods of time, make sure you take a bottle of water or better yet, a sports drink, to replenish fluids quickly.

Stay safe and sound

  • Keep your shoes on when outside and wash your hands before eating.
  • Jetlag isn’t pretty, but fight the temptation to dive into the hotel bed at 2pm and go for a walk instead. Sticking to regular sleeping patterns will help you bounce back quicker. Also try essential oils such as eucalyptus, geranium, grapefruit, lavender, lemongrass or peppermint dabbed on your forehead or on the balls of your feet for an extra boost.
  • Going on a boat or a long car trip? Combat travel sickness by taking ginger tablets one hour before leaving. Peppermint, spearmint and lavender will also help.
  • If you’re trekking at high altitudes make sure you give your body time to adjust to the thinning air and carry adequate supplies.

Get around town

  • If you’re new to a city, the best way to get your bearings is to take a tour so you don’t spend hours with your nose in a guidebook.
  • If hiring a car carefully check it for dents and scratches and insist the rental company makes a written note to confirm them, so you’re not landed with a repair bill.
  • Collect local bus, train tram and monorail timetables so you can catch as much public transport as possible — it’s cheaper and often quicker than taking taxis.

Quick, super smart tips

  • To safeguard your holiday pics, whether on film or a digital memory card, take a photograph of your address on the first frame, then if they go missing you’ll have the best chance of getting them back.
  • Avoid making long distance calls from your hotel room, it’s expensive! Use reduced rate phone cards.
  • Divide your money into cash, traveller’s cheques and credit cards and keep each in different spots in case you lose your wallet.
  • Don’t use laundry services at hotels; instead go to a local Laundromat or take some clothes soap and wash underwear in the bathroom basin. It’s much cheaper.
  • Keep a travel journal, blog or Twitter account, so you have something to look back on when you get home.
  • Always check under the bed and in the cupboards before checking out of a room. You’d be amazed what people leave behind!
  • Late night shopping is different in most states in Australia – ask locals for the insider info.

Telephone and Communications
In an emergency dial 000 (not 999). This will link you to the ambulance, fire and police services.
Need an interpreter? The telecommunications provider Telstra offers a 24 hour translation and interpreter service. Dial 13 14 50. The local white pages telephone book will provide more information.

Healthcare for visitors to Australia
The Australian Government has signed Reciprocal Health Care Agreements (RHCA) with the United Kingdom, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, Sweden, the Netherlands, Finland, Belgium, Norway, Slovenia, Malta and Italy. These agreements entitle you to some subsidised health services for essential medical treatment while visiting Australia.

Access to medical cover
Reciprocal Health Care Agreements cover treatment that is medically essential: this means any ill health or injury which occurs while you are in Australia and
requires treatment before you return home.

Your entitlements
As a resident of one of these countries, the United Kingdom, Sweden, the Netherlands, Finland, Belgium, Norway, Slovenia, Malta and Italy, you are entitled to the following health or injury treatments while you are in Australia:

  • free treatment as a public in-patient or out-patient in a public hospital
  • subsidised medicine under the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS)
  • Medicare benefits for out-of-hospital treatment provided by a doctor.

Further information on Australian travel healthcare is here.